Selected Published Works


Refereed/Peer-Reviewed Work

Invited Anthology Chapter

Badruddoja, R. (2016). “Holidays in America for South Asian Women” (Tourism Essentials series). In Asian Genders and Tourism. Khoo-Lattimore, Catheryn (ed.). Bristol, U.K.: Channel View Publications.

Purchasing Options: Channel View/Amazon

Journal Articles

Badruddoja, R. (2014). “Third World Woman: Family, And Marriage: South Asian Diasporic Fiction As A Site For Consolidation Of The American Nation-State.” South Asian Review, 35:2, 81-104. Badruddoja SAR

A reviewer writes, “This peer-reviewed article offers a rich social analysis of four popular works of fiction, employing a content analysis methodology to probe the social construction of South Asian-American identity in the US context. Dr. Badruddoja’s critical analysis identifies the projection of cultural stereotypes across a terrain of cultural displacement. She uncovers static and untenable assertions about Asian American identity that obfuscates a dynamic re-definitioning of identity, rather than one of abandonment, and she points to the relevance of these conclusions in an ideological context of “American Orientalism” as well as the contemporary US political context of anti-immigrant policies. [T]his is an excellent, state of the art piece of social analysis regarding contested ethnic identity and a testimony to her methodological savvy with data that is deftly derived from the realm of popular culture.” 

 

Badruddoja, R. (2008, Summer). “Queer Spaces, Places, and Gender: The Tropologies of Rupa and Ronica.” Feminist Formations (formerly known as National Women’s Studies Association Journal or NWSAJ), 20:2,156-88. Badruddoja NWSAJ

A reviewer writes, “This peer-reviewed article is an exceptionally powerful exploration of intersectionality and contested identity formation based in critical ethnographic field research. Dr. Badruddoja offers an analysis of diasporic identity in the context of sexual and racial binaries, challenging these binaries with a more nuanced and political view of women who refuse to define themselves as either lesbian or bisexual, but who instead come to self-define and embrace a “queer” identity more “elastically” as a flexible and liberating category. Through this brilliant ethnographic exploration, Dr. Badruddoja challenges established Queer Theory with cross-cultural, diasporic insights that shed new light on the very nature of ethnic and gender identity creation.”

 

Badruddoja, R. (2008, Spring). The Yonic Myths of Motherhood: An Autoethnography. Journal of the Motherhood Initiative of Research and Community Involvement (JMIRCI) (formerly known as Association for Research on Mothering or JARM), Special Edition: Caregiving and Carework: Theory and Practice), 10.1,57-65. Badruddoja JARM

A reviewer writes, “This peer-reviewed piece is a sensitive auto-ethnographical piece that explores maternal ideology and the thickly layered dilemmas that are intertwined with pregnancy. This powerful and highly creative work ultimately questions the right-to choose/right-to-life binary as a false dichotomy imposed on women as accompanied baggage of larger ideological struggles. As such, it is a timely contribution that informs larger, ongoing controversies while simultaneously contributing to the discipline of women and gender studies.”

 

Badruddoja, R. (2006, Spring). “Resisting the White Pole: A Feminist Ethnographic Study, Second-Generation South Asian-American Women, U.S. Racialization Projects, and the Arranged Marriage.” International Journal of Sociology of the Family, 32,1:19-60.

A reviewer writes, “This article treats the history of transatlantic South Asian migration to the United States through a sophisticated, theoretical analysis of contradictory narratives within diasporic marriage practices. It offers significant theoretical contributions through its critique of the cultural displacement model. At the same time, it defends the validity of a micro-analytic approach to diasporic research.”

 

Badruddoja, R. (2006, Spring). “White Spaces and Brown Traveling Bodies: A Project of Reworking Otherness.” International Review of Modern Sociology, 32,1:1-34.

A reviewer writes, “This article treats the history of transatlantic South Asian migration to the United States through a sophisticated, theoretical analysis of contradictory narratives within diasporic marriage practices. It offers significant theoretical contributions through its critique of the cultural displacement model. At the same time, it defends the validity of a micro-analytic approach to diasporic research.”

 

Badruddoja, R. (2005, Fall). “Color, Beauty, and Marriage: The Ivory Skin Model.” South Asian Graduate Research Journal (SAGAR), 15:43-79. Badruddoja SAGAR

A reviewer writes, “This peer-reviewed piece focuses on the politics of skin color and how it interfaces with women’s status hierarchies and marriage marketability. [T]his article was cited by two scholars in a 2010 book published by Cambridge Publishing, UK entitled Cultural Production in Virtual and Imagined Worlds. The authors state in their first chapter that “Roksana Badruddoja points out that South Asian Women have internalized the “ivory skin model,” privileging fair skin as the axiom upon which beauty is built and prevalent because of the influence of the Indian entertainment industry, which includes the Bollywood film industry.” [T]he article was again cited in a 2014 book Goa Portuguesa e Pós-Colonial by the Portuguese scholar Dr. Cláudia Pereira, an anthropologist at the University of Lisbon.”

 

 Scholarly & Literary Book Reviews

 Invited Editor-Reviewed Literary Book Review

Badruddoja, R. (Jan-Feb 2014). The World In My Hands by K. Aniz Ahmed. India: Random House, 2013. 376 pp. (paperback). Northeast Review, Issue 8.

 

Invited Peer-Reviewed Scholarly Book Review

Badruddoja, R. (2010). Dowry, Bridging the Gap Between Theory and Practice, edited by Tamsin Bradley, Emma Tomalin, and Mangala Subramaniam (2009), London & New York: Zed Books Limited. Gender & Society, Vol. XX, No. X: 1-3. Dowry Book Rev

Creative Editor-Reviewed Work

Invited Book Prologue

Badruddoja, R. (2014). Invisible Identities: Bringing the Voices of the Women of Katakhali to the Center” (translated in Bengali by Shamita Das Dasgupta). Pgs. 66-68 in Her Words: Storytelling with Saris. Bose, Monica J. (ed.). Dhaka, Bangladesh: Samhati. Her Words Storytelling with Saris 64-68

 

Article in Literary & Art E-Magazine

Badruddoja, R. (June 1, 2015). “The Invisibility and Marginality of Motherwork.” In Mothers Are Making Art (MAMA). Rose, Martha Joy (ed.). New York, NY: Museum of Motherhood (M.O.M.) (In partnership with Procreate Project).

Badruddoja, R. (2007, Winter). The Yonic Myths of Motherhood: Contesting Maternal Ideology. DesiLit Magazine, 3.

 

Editor-Reviewed Community Publications

Invited Local Newspaper Article

Badruddoja, R. (2008, Oct-Nov). Brief History of South Asian Emigration to the U.S. Porshi, 8:7. [Annual Bangladeshi-American Community Magazine published by Bay Area Bangladeshi Association (B.A.B.A.)]

Badruddoja, R. (2008, April). ’Good’ Muslim, ‘Bad’ Muslim. The Undercurrent, 2,12,19. [Local Community Newspaper, Fresno, CA]

 

Blog

“Roksana Badruddoja writes an open letter to her students, à la Shannon Gibney, Saida Grundy and Zandria F. Robinson.”CONDITIONALLY ACCEPTED ( read over 20,000; third most read blog post)